Peace & Justice Monuments
Monday’s Monument: Flame of Compassion, Denver, Colorado

Monday’s Monument: Flame of Compassion, Denver, Colorado

The “Flame of Compassion” is a aeolian wind harp which is in constant harmonic communication with the elemental heartbeat of nature. This sculpture stands as a metaphor for the constant vigilance and genuine intent held to create Harmony as the preferred outcome in...

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Monday’s Monument: Jan Karski Statue, New York, New York

Monday’s Monument: Jan Karski Statue, New York, New York

Jan Karski was a World War II Polish resistance fighter who risked his life to bring firsthand reports of the Holocaust to the Allies. This statue of him is on the southeast corner of Madison Avenue & 37th St., in front of the Polish Consulate. This bronze statue...

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Monday’s Monument: La Rogativa, San Juan, Puerto Rico

Monday’s Monument: La Rogativa, San Juan, Puerto Rico

La Rogativa is a famous bronze statue located in the Plazuela de la Rogativa on Caleta de las Monjas near La Puerta de San Juan. Derived from the verb rogar, meaning to plea or to supplicate, a rogativa is a procession making a plea to God for help. British troops,...

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Since May 2015, every Monday morning I have been posting a little essay about a peace or social justice monument. For more than a decade, ever since the peaceCENTER was contracted by a national peace & human rights group to develop a workshop exploring strategies for creating memorials about acts of violence and injustice that did not glorify the bloodshed, we have pondered the relationship between the landscape and civic memory.

“I would rather take care of the stomachs of the living
than the glory of the departed in the form of monuments.”

Alfred Nobel

As we showcase these monuments we hope you will join us in this exploration. For now, we’re concentrating on publicly accessible outdoor works. Some are grassroots and homespun; others, more complicated in their funding and execution. They all have a story to tell and we can learn from all of them.

Monday’s Monument: Messenger of Peace, Manchester, England

Monday’s Monument: Messenger of Peace, Manchester, England

The Messenger of Peace sculpture was the winner of a 1986 competition to celebrate the status of Manchester as the world's first nuclear free city. This bronze statue, created by sculptor Barbara Pearson, was the winning entry and it showed a woman with doves around...

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Monday’s Monument: Embodied, Los Angeles, California

Monday’s Monument: Embodied, Los Angeles, California

Unveiled in October, 2014, this statue, created by Los Angeles artist Alison Saar, is intended to exemplify the spirit and values of justice represented in the roles of District Attorney’s Office and the Sheriff’s Department, the tenants of the recently renovated Hall...

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Monday’s Monument: Resolution, Nicosia, Cyprus

Monday’s Monument: Resolution, Nicosia, Cyprus

Resolution (1995), by Cypriot sculptor Theodoulos Grigoriou, reiterates the faith of the city of Nicosia and its inhabitants to human rights as the only precondition to peace and freedom. On the round cement base, part of the text of the Universal Declaration of Human...

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Monday’s Monument: Bukit Kasih, Kanonang Village, Indonesia

Monday’s Monument: Bukit Kasih, Kanonang Village, Indonesia

Bukit Kasih translates as Peace Hill or Hill of Love. It was built in 2002 as a spiritual center where religious followers from various faiths can gather, meditate and worship side by side "at the lush and misty tropical hill." The people of north Sulawesi Island...

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Monday’s Monument: The Petrified, Geneva, Switzerland

Monday’s Monument: The Petrified, Geneva, Switzerland

Just off the United Nations Square, up a small rise, is the Musee International de la Croix-Rouge et du Croissant-Rouge (the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum.) As you walk up the ramp to the museum entrance, you encounter a group of shrouded, life-size...

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Monday’s Monument: Mary Barbour Statue, Glasgow, Scotland

Monday’s Monument: Mary Barbour Statue, Glasgow, Scotland

Mary was a key figure in the 1915 Rent Strikes, which exposed and protested against landlords who took advantage of the wartime economy to hike up rents for workers, evicting those who could not pay. The protests forced a change in the law with the introduction of the...

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Monday’s Monument: Bury the Hatchet, San Antonio, TX

Monday’s Monument: Bury the Hatchet, San Antonio, TX

This engraved stone is embedded in the pavement in front of the Bexar County Court House in Main Plaza / Plaza de las Islas. It says: Captain Toribio de Urrutia and Fray Santa Ana now determined to do their best to establish a permanent and lasting peace with the...

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Monday’s Monument: Healing Hands, Ennis, Ireland

Monday’s Monument: Healing Hands, Ennis, Ireland

The limestone sculpture of two humans hands by Shane Gilmore were placed on the grounds of Saints Peter and Paul Cathedral in May, 2008. The hands were dedicated to several concepts as shown on the plaques below the sculpture:  Hands sculptured by Shane Gilmore Hands...

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Monday’s Monument: Handspan, Wanganui, New Zealand

Monday’s Monument: Handspan, Wanganui, New Zealand

Handspan is a large work of art, almost 20 meters in diameter, which rises in a double spiraled pathway to a height of about 3 meters with walls on each side, covered with some 4,000 terracotta hand casts made from hand prints of community members of all ages (from 3...

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Monday’s Monument: Hand of Peace, Walnut Creek, California

Monday’s Monument: Hand of Peace, Walnut Creek, California

“Hand of Peace” by Benjamin Bufano, is made of copper, mosaic and stained glass. The 30-foot-tall open-hand figure has stained glass around the fingers and a mural in the middle of the palm featuring a group of children. Above them, an inscription reads, “The children...

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Monday’s Monument: Hand of Peace, Barnard’s Green, England

Monday’s Monument: Hand of Peace, Barnard’s Green, England

Rose Garrard was commissioned in 1998 to create this sculpture to draw attention to an existing commemorative stone on a war memorial site in Barnard’s Green, which was neglected and regularly vandalized. She researched and developed the designs in consultation with...

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Monday’s Monument: A Grande Mão, São Paulo, Brazil

Monday’s Monument: A Grande Mão, São Paulo, Brazil

"The Big Hand" was designed by architect Oscar Niemeyer in 1989 as the focal point of the the Latin America Memorial (in Portuguese, Memorial da América Latina), a cultural, political and leisure complex. This large hand is perhaps a nod to his mentor Corbusier’s open...

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MONUMENT (n.)

late 13c., “a sepulchre,” from Old French monument “grave, tomb, monument,” and directly from Latin monumentum “a monument, memorial structure, statue; votive offering; tomb; memorial record,” literally “something that reminds,” from monere “to admonish, warn, advice,” from PIE *moneyo-, suffixed (causative) form of root *men- (1) “to think.” Sense of “structure or edifice to commemorate a notable person, action, or event” first attested c. 1600.

Ten Questions to Ask at a Historic Site

In his book Lies Across America, Professor James Loewen posed these ten questions to ask at a historic site.

1. When did this location become a historic site? (When was the marker or monument put up? Or the house interpreted?) How did that time differ from ours? From the time of the event or person interpreted?

2. Who sponsored it? representing which participant groups’s point of view? What was their position in the social structure when the event occurred? When the site went “up”?

3. What were the sponsor’s motives? What were their ideological needs and social purposes? What were their values?

4. What is the intended audience for the site? What values were they trying to leave for us, today? What does the site ask us to go and do or think about?

5. Did the sponsors have government support? At what level? Who was ruling the government at the time? What ideological arguments were used to get the government acquiescence?

6. Who is left out? What points of view go largely unheard? How would the story differ if a different group told it? Another political party? Race? Sex? Class? Religious group?

7. Are there problematic (insulting, degrading) words or symbols that would not be used today, or by other groups?

8. How is the site used today? Do traditional rituals continue to connect today’s public to it? Or is it ignored? Why?

9. Is the presentation accurate? What actually happened? What historical sources tell of the event, people, or period commemorated at this site?

10. How does the site fit in with others that treat the same era? Or subject? What other people lived ad events happened then but are not commemorated? Why?

Want to learn more about monuments? Check out my bookshelf.

Ready to Kill

by Carl Sandburg (Chicago Poems, 1916)

TEN minutes now I have been looking at this.
I have gone by here before and wondered about it.
This is a bronze memorial of a famous general
Riding horseback with a flag and a sword and a revolver on him.
I want to smash the whole thing into a pile of junk to be hauled away to the scrap yard.
I put it straight to you,
After the farmer, the miner, the shop man, the factory hand, the fireman and the teamster,
Have all been remembered with bronze memorials,
Shaping them on the job of getting all of us
Something to eat and something to wear,
When they stack a few silhouettes
Against the sky
Here in the park,
And show the real huskies that are doing the work of the world, and feeding people instead of butchering them,
Then maybe I will stand here
And look easy at this general of the army holding a flag in the air,
And riding like hell on horseback
Ready to kill anybody that gets in his way,
Ready to run the red blood and slush the bowels of men all over the sweet new grass of the prairie.

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